Recovery From Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

Most people can return to normal activity after six months or so of recovery time from minimally invasive spine surgery. In general, after the initial six months, the risks for re-injury to the spine go down substantially and most can return to a fairly normal state in a matter of several weeks.

Recovery time can vary based on complications, age, history, weight, and other health problems. Typically, a younger person is able to heal more quickly than an older person.

A more invasive and complex surgery will require a longer recovery period than a minimally invasive spine surgery. In fact, this is one of the reasons why people choose minimally invasive spine surgery. It leads to a shorter recovery period.

Common Complications

The complications and risks of minimally invasive spine surgery are fairly synonymous. Complications can include problems with:

  • Anesthesia
  • Infection
  • Re-Injury
  • Other health concerns

Other health concerns could be a secondary cause that leads to surgery such as if the patient had some kind of pulmonary embolism, DVT or something of that nature. However, paralysis is possible only in extreme circumstances.

It is possible that the patient can have muscle or ligament damage if the tissue is disrupted during the back surgery. Due to the surgery being located on the spine, there can also be nerve damage or problems that arise. A nerve problem is a neurological problem which is a known risk of any spine surgery.

Re-Injury

The patient must follow all of the doctor’s recommendations while recovering post operation. If they do not, they will be at a greater risk of re-injuring themselves One of the things that can hold the recovery back is when the patient re-injures themselves. If the patient suffers a complication, in an extreme circumstance, that can mean the patient requires a revision surgery.

One of the things that can hold the recovery back is when the patient re-injures themselves. If the patient suffers a complication due to re-injury, in an extreme circumstance, that can mean the patient requires a revision surgery.

The additional surgery could delay the patient from returning to normal activities. Revision surgery also could mean that the patient might have a more serious surgery than was originally performed.

Our spinal surgeons┬átry to make a collection of what is the least invasive option to treat the patient’s symptoms. However, if minimally invasive spine surgery does not fix the problem, the patient may require a very invasive traditional open spine surgery.

Bone Disease Complications

If someone is osteoarthritic or if they have osteoporosis or arthritis, it could complicate the healing process. However, when someone has significant health problems such as a bone disorder, they may not be a candidate for minimally invasive spine surgery. Your Tampa bay spine doctor would be aware of the health complications and take steps toward determining the best procedure for your condition, as well as the extra steps to take for your protection.